What gets measured gets done’

My favourite management truisms are probably ‘what gets measured gets done’ or if you prefer ‘if you don’t measure it, you can’t manage it’ The problem sometimes is selecting the right things to measure and then deciding how often and how long to measure them and what to do with the results.

How about this – how many new telephone enquiries did your business receive last week? How many achieved the callers objectives and how many achieved your practice objectives? All readily measurable and all very important KPI’s .

Episode 119 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Chris Newton offers his advice

Best regards

Top 5 ways technicians (nurses) fail doctors (vets)

This is a management video – not a clinical one – and yet – an effective working relationship between vets and nurses this side of the pond – or between doctors and technicians in north America – is critical for the quality of clinical care for animals and professional services for your clients.

Episode 118 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Dave Nicol and Andy Roarke demonstrate what can go wrong.

Best regards

Marketing is driven by your Vision, Core Values, and Mission

It used to be said that practice owners weren’t comfortable about the need to market their practice servicers and that the whole concept of selling professional services was somehow unethical. I don’t think that’s true anymore. If you believe that marketing is all about understanding the marketplace in which your practice operates, your existing and potential customers, the animals they own, the services available to them and the services they are looking for – then you understand the need for marketing. Is that enough or is it more complex than that.

Episode 118 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Peter Weinstein suggests that the role of marketing in your practice starts with and is driven by your Vision, Core Values, and Mission.

Best regards

Will your practice sell me a nappy for my cat?

Do your reception staff ever get asked really unusual questions by pet owners who call-in or phone the practice? Of course they do. We’ve all heard of clients who want their cat castorised, neutrelised, knockerlated, sprayed or splayed – and in most cases skilled staff can gently correct them and respond positively to their request. What do you think your reception staff would say if I phoned and asked them if the practice could sell me a nappy for the cat?

Episode 117 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which Joel Parker tells us what happened in his practice when a brand new client telephoned and asked that very question – in his case of course they used the word ‘diaper’ instead of nappy

Best regards

Lift your staff performance to new heights

If you believe in Murphy’s law which suggests that anything that can go wrong will go wrong, then you probably recognise the power of expectation which controls your life – subconsciously – through self-fulfilling prophesies. The expectations of your family, your friends and your colleagues, can modify your behavior for better or for worse – and your own expectations can fill you with energy, or drive you to despair. What’s all this got to do with your veterinary practice? Well if on the one hand, you expect business to be bad, if will be bad. If on the other, you really expect to be busier today than yesterday, you will be

Episode 117 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Chris Newton says the same is true for your staff and suggests how you can help them to lift their performance to new heights

Best regards

Is the leaders attitude the key to business success?

Do you select potential employees because of their skills and qualifications or on their attitude to your practice, the services you offer and the clients you serve. If you believe as I do that, that one of the top reasons why clients leave a practice is because of a perceived lack of interest and concern by the practice staff, then you’ll place ‘attitude’ amongst the top ‘must haves’ for anyone you employ. So it is with management. Ian Dickson a well-known business coach here in the UK believes that the attitude or mindset of the leader is a key component of any formula for business success.

Episode 116 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Ian explains what he has in mind

Best regards

The bathtub model for leaders just like you

Have you ever heard about the bathtub curve? – nor had I – but I understand that it’s a term which is used quite widely in management to describe for example failure rates in product manufacture and even mortality rates in young children.

Episode 116 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which in which Edward Muzio explains the bathtub model for leaders just like you, and the relationship between the leader and the practice team over a period of time.

Best regards

Increasing Your Veterinary Practice Referrals

Can I ask you a couple of questions about your client database? First – how many new clients did your practice register last month – and how did that figure compare with the number you need – first to replace those that have lapsed and second – to grow the database? The next question is how many of those new clients came to your practice as a direct result of a personal recommendation from one of your existing clients

Episode 115 of the Veterinary Business Video Show includes a clip in which Diederik Gelderman offers some advice

Best regards

What will be the most important conversation in your practice today?

Will it be between you and the bank manager, your accountant or your partners? Should it be the conversations between your employees and your clients or maybe the discussion that you should be having with your staff if their performance doesn’t match your expectations. Andy Roark, a vet and practice management consultant in the United States certainly thinks so.

Episode 115 of the Veterinary Business Video Showincludes a clip in which Andy explains what he has in mind.

Best regards

Achieving acceptance and compliance on a consistent basis

Joel Parker, a vet and business consultant from Canada, says that whether you’re in the consulting room presenting a medical care plan or on the phone fielding a call, there always has to be a degree of acceptance on the part of the client firstly, that there is a problem, secondly that you’ve got the solution – and thirdly that a cost is involved. Only when the client accepts that situation, are they likely to consider compliance with your recommendations

Episode 114 of the Veterinary Business Video Show includes a clip in which Joel suggests how you can go about achieving acceptance and compliance on a consistent basis

Best regards